reMembering

My parents have arrived in town for a visit this weekend. And of course I know that the REAL reason they are here is to spend time sitting around my pregnant wife and their future grandchild (their first!).   At this stage, doctors say that the baby can hear outside the womb (which is why I am playing all kinds of music every chance I can– I want this kid to have a great sense of rhythm).  This is a threshold moment for my family– a moment when the past will pour into the future.

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Peaches have been picked and the Augusts sunsets are beautiful

A member stood up in Joys and Sorrows last week and shared about how much comfort it gave him to see the children of our church– as someone who is in the later stages of life, spending time with the church children gives him a palpable sense of relief and comfort. Though the future (hopefully far future) won’t have him physically in it, who he is, what he cares about, and his values, are literally going to be carried into the future via these children.

When we “re-member,” yes we recall something from the past.  But the word member means “a part of a whole.” So the work of re-Membering is the work of becoming again a part of a whole.   We rework the whole to accommodate not only our memories of the past but also to accommodate the new parts of our whole–parts and people that will take up, transform, and carry on our past– will carry on “us.”  Of the many things a religious community does, re-Membering is one of the most special.

Speaking of remembering,  remember the first day of school after the summer?  Please send lots of love and courage to our families with school-age children– this week many of our children (and parents and guardians) had their first day of school, (not to mention the many teachers and former teachers in the UUFSC community!).

This Sunday, please join Sharon Arpoika and Bernadette Burns, two members who carry lots of story and memories of UUFSC, who will lead us in worship: Filling Your Spirit With Song–Music and singing are integral parts of our Unitarian Universalist worship services. Whether it’s classical, rock, folk, or a cappella, music shifts the energy of worship and moves it into our bodies. This Sunday we’ll connect to Spirit, and to one another, through hymn singing, chanting, Taize and more.

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